Blizzard Zero G 95

Blizzard Zero G 95
Category: Ski touring
Level: Medium
Brand: Blizzard
Modelyear: 2019
Measure (Tip/Waist/Tail): 128/95/111 mm Turning radius: 20.00 m Weight: 1190 gram (171 cm)
Sizes: 164,171,178,185 cm
Manufacturers description
Whether it’s a quick skin up your local peak or a full-on high alpine traverse, the Zero G 95 is the perfect all-round touring ski for any terrain and any snow conditions. Featuring our latest Carbon Drive technology for minimal weight, and maximum downhill performance, the Zero G 95 guarantees the best backcountry experience in all conditions. A 95 mm waist gives it plenty of float in the backcountry and will have you grinning all the way down into the valley.

(Official information from Blizzard)


What do you think about Blizzard Zero G 95?
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5 reviews
Pillard
12/04/2019
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Strenghts:
Phantom light and flexible

Weaknesses:
Of course, light and therefore not a ski to bomb the snow with.

Summary:
I tested the back to back up next to my Enforcer 93. The difference in weight and agility in kick turns etc was absolutely huge. The kilo you save is a bigger difference than you might think.

Model year: 2017
Riding style: Everything except park
Length on the ski: 178 cm
Riders weight: 75 kg
Riders length: 188 cm

Vattendroppe
11/03/2019
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Strenghts:
--- --- ROOM APPEARANCE
Immediately when I got up the skis from the packaging I was struck by the weight, or rather the lack thereof. These are not skis that try to be all-round, they are focused on being real ride machines. The impression was confirmed when I put them on the kitchen scales and it showed 2419 grams. Per couple. It is just over 1200 grams per ski, which is turned over ridiculously for a ski with 95-waist and wooden core.

The secret is, according to Blizzard, an updated variant of the carbon fiber layer that has been the cornerstone of the Zero G series since it started. The new version should be lighter and more powerful than the previous version. I haven't traveled any Zero G ski earlier, so I can't make a direct comparison, but the updated product is undeniably easy. Combine this ski with a lightweight, or even skimo-race bond, and a final weight of 1300 grams per foot is within reach.

The skis are stiff, which is impressive in relation to the weight. I have been driving on most considerably heavier skis with less buoyancy. The flex profile is classically compliant, softest in tip, stiffest under foot and a tail that lies in between, without any real surprises along the way.

Shape-wise, the skis are of a more classic cut than what is "standard" today. While a classic shaped tail is quite common on tour-oriented teams - a small indentation and a short kicktail instead of full tailrocker gives many advantages up - Blizzard has also chosen to do the tips of the skis in similar spirit, with a slightly shorter indentation and slightly shorter tiprocks than the corresponding skis from other brands.

Regarding the weight, I personally think that skis that move towards "ridiculously light" are a bit scary. How much core is it that keeps the bindings in place? This is nothing I worried about with the Zero G 95, however, drilling through the carbon fiber layer was almost a project in itself. It is definitely nothing that is a gimmick, had the carbon fiber not revealed itself on the black powder that came out of the borehole, it might as well have been double metal layers I drilled through.

---UP---
I don't know what to say more than the skis are a dream on the way up. Light weight and a shape that fits well to go uphill is a combination that is hard to beat simply. It is clear that this is a ski that is made for, and thrives best on, tours.

The only thing I have to note is that a little more tiprocker had helped get the skis up when tracking in deep, real route, snow. Not exactly what the sought-after base to go for, and it is really going to go into ridiculously small details, but the only thing I have to say about these skis on the way out is not just milk and honey. In deep snow that is totally totally through it, there is no problem whatsoever to track, the skis come up and lie down on the snow cover completely on their own.

To sum up, there are a couple of skis that are so close to what is perfectly possible on the road.

PREFERRED --- ---
-MANCHESTER-
Okay, okay, I know. It really is not in the piste these skis belong. But taking some turns in the piste and squeezing says a lot of a crude's performance, at least for skis that are in the "narrower" width segment.

I have to say I was surprised at how good they are in the piste. When it comes to lighter skis, there are many that are only suitable for "guide turns" and are very unresponsive, boring and flattery. Zero G 95 is at the opposite end of the scale. As long as the substrate is even and nice, it is possible to lay clean cuttings and press firmly. The skis provide proper response and getting pop feel from the turn is no problem. At the piste cutter I also ran them with Dynafit Vulcan on my feet, a ski boot that is really stiff. I had no problem with "pushing through" the skis, driving them with a stiffer boot works great.

The bite in them is, in relation to the weight and width, exemplary. In a broader perspective, it means "okay" - adding clean cuttings to forgiving surfaces is easy, but getting them to keep a clean cut on harder surfaces is not a highlight. The torsional stiffness is not enough. But on the other hand, whoever expected it on a lightweight ski with 95 mm waist I do not know.

-REQUESTED / EQUALIZED
Here is an area that is significantly more relevant to this ski, and an area where it does really well. Just as in the piste, the ski gives a lot of response, and it is by no means difficult to get a really playful and pulse-filled driving experience.

In deep snow, the combination of the "narrow" waist and the relatively small tip coat makes it quite necessary much speed to run the modern surfing style, but well there the skis thrive very well. I have not been able to find any direct speed limit on the skis, but unfortunately the weather and snow conditions in Narvik have not given proper location to touch the big loading hat. Running low-speed pillows is also no problem either, but it takes some inspiration from old-fashioned pumping technology.

Even on tougher, even, it is no problem to drive properly. In fact, I find that I get a smaller broadcasting shack at high speed on hard surfaces with these skis than other skis in the same class of width I drove.

-BRANT AND / OR TIGHT-
This is another area where the ski really brilliantly. Low swing weight is fantastic when it is to be thrown around in small-scrubbed northern Scandinavian forest, or jumped in some steep gutter. And low weight automatically gives low swing weight.

The weight is also partly combined with poppy and responsiveness, which gives a fantastic ski to lick around in the woods, jump on every little pillow and get filled with that bubbling joy that only a pleasure filled forest sow can provide. It also combined with a relatively long turning radius and an exemplary edge grip, which results in a ski that likes to eat steep and narrow for both breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Weaknesses:
PREFERRED --- ---
-DIRECTED / UNDERSTANDED
On uneven ground, the ski shows its shortcomings. The big sacrifice for a ski that is like floating on pink clouds on the way out is that the lack of weight in the ski makes it difficult to break through existing structures in the snow.

As long as there are single tracks or ice cream cones, it is no problem, the ski can be run in exactly the same way as in untracked. But when it starts to "lift the alps just before lunch the day after the dump" (the jacks call it crud), or a real cauliflower day in the year, it becomes dreadful and the skis begin to behave nervously and moody. Of course it does, even with a certain element of speed and grace, but generally it is not enjoyable in the same way as it can be with a heavier ski.

---SUSTAINABILITY---
The fact that the bindings are properly placed has already been discussed, but light skis also have a tendency to wear quickly in other respects. They are fatter with wear and tear as a pair of "regular" skis would wander away without thinking twice about it. With the relatively short time I have driven them so far, it is difficult to draw any bomb-proof conclusions, but what I have seen points to that Zero G 95 is more like other lightweight skis in wear-sensitivity than it is in other areas.

At the time I used them, I got a relatively high number of well-visible hacks in topsheet and in most places it is "plastic strips" that peel off from topsheet. It's just cosmetic details, but it gives a hint of how general sustainability is.

I have also managed to get an injury on one of the sidewalls of the ski, where the ends of some kind of fiber stuck out and that needed to be sealed with epoxy. This damage certainly occurred during a heavy crash, but I have never succeeded in anything like this on skis in higher weight classes.

That being said, I would like to emphasize that this is not something weird for a lightweight ski. It just means that the Zero G 95 does not surprise in its wear resistance in the same way as it surprised in the performance areas.

Summary:
Blizzard Zero G 95 of the 19/20 model is a real turbine. It is a specialized ski that is to be used in luck and does not claim to be an onequiver or all-round ski. It also leads to the fact that it is probably as close to the optimum turntable as can be reached in its breadth class. The weight is so low that it is possible to do it without sacrificing ride characteristics - other than what comes as a direct result of the low weight.

For those seeking a ski to be used exclusively, or almost exclusively, as a ski trail, I can only recommend it with gold stars in all corners. It is responsive and reliable to perform as well as a complete dream up. In the case of uneven snow, it must work more with getting it because of its weight, but it never disappears.

This ski will be my new first choice for tours in the future, but when it comes to lift-borne riding, I will choose something heavier.

rating:
As a hiking trail: 5 (+) / 5
As a ski slope: 5/5
As a ski slope: 3/5
As lift-mounted off-piste ski: 3.5 / 5

Model year: 2020
Riding style: Is not the biggest charge hat on the mountain, but both pillows jump and drips rocks when the breath falls on. Would probably completely get rid of NM - much better sweating in some trough (on the way up or down is not necessarily
Length on the ski: 178 cm
Riders weight: 75 kg
Riders length: 181 cm



nilsv
10/01/2019
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Strenghts:
Very light but still stable
Versatile and suitable for Swedish conditions
Nice design.

Weaknesses:
Missing score for top bracket of head shells, which is found in most skis from dynafit and hagan.
Fluttery and slightly unstable at high speed on uneven surfaces.
Coat over and under delicate.

Summary:
As a former binder-bound Armada JJ-tourer, you almost lose your chin the first time you take a pair of Zero G95 in hand. The light weight combined with a good all-round width of 95 mm, and there with also the possibilities for remote mountains in especially Jämtland, was what made me fall for the ski. One year, and many long trips, steep gorges and forests later, the green dangers have managed to accomplish a real horse job! Long slides on the plate before you reach the mountains is in Jämtland more rule than exception. It also requires something light under the feet because 80% of your forces should not be wasted on flat ground. The combination of zero g95, ATK SLR binding and a couple of narrow race skins from Pomoca have succeeded in turning a devotee's former weary attitude towards flat mountain land into something positive. Once the mountain is to be climbed, the pulse is inevitably raised for where the slope increases, even with a pair of 1250-gram skis under the feet. But the time difference to the top is still markedly improved and the skis are also easy enough to carry longer back pieces on the backpack, when the step iron has advanced and the slope has become too steep. In general, more peaks per day can be used, or why not the same number of peaks as before, with much more comfortable trips up and more spent time in the sun pit?

The performance performance is surprisingly multifaceted and I can really only object on the ski on two occasions. With their hard flex combined with low weight, they manage to maintain relatively good rigidity in higher speeds, but it quickly becomes more difficult with hard, irregular surfaces as the skis tend to become swayy and flabby. This is mainly because the low weight is reminiscent. This is not really the shit to chew through hard drive snaps or to take the boldest drops. But with softer conditions with predictability in the substrate, there is no major problem with pressing both large and tighter turns, which occasionally causes me to utter a joy jut on the way down to the coffee bar. At the only pistachio I carried with the skis, I was positively surprised by the potential of edge grip on more icy areas.

95 mm is a well-balanced width for Swedish conditions where, after all, we are usually drawn with harder, less snow-rich parties, without for that reason making you disappointed in the event of imprinted powder day. For a heavier person who mainly goes on days when it snows a lot, the option 108 mm waist can be better! This is the ski for those who want a top-travel-oriented, light ski, but still maintain the conditions for yokes that get stuck in memory for a long time to come. The ski is advantageously combined with a lightweight tech-tie and top ski boots and whips so have really cruel conditions for exploring and experiencing the slightly more difficult-to-reach mountains! I have even seen glances of envy from friends who adhere to heavy, stable and 95% performance-oriented equipment. If top tours are your primary way of exercising skiing, there are not many reasons for me to stick to heavy old frame bindings and stable, fat skis anymore.

Model year: 2018
Riding style: Topptur
Length on the ski: 178 cm
Riders weight: 75 kg
Riders length: 181 cm





larsjohnsson
03/01/2019
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Strenghts:
Easy and fun to go

Weaknesses:
Shaky in hard before

Summary:
Funny ski in loose before. Surfing great in powder and superb in soft piste. Slightly worse in hard piste and icy bow. Slightly shaky on cord.

Model year: 2018
Riding style: Topptur
Length on the ski: 185 cm
Riders weight: 95 kg
Riders length: 196 cm

tmlarsson
28/12/2018
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Strenghts:
Easy, sickly good edge grip and stable enough to land quite large cliffs and raggare.

Weaknesses:
The coating is easily scratched. Just for sharp edges from the factory. The ski gets sick nervously and chops on harder surfaces. But if you cut down the edges about 25-30 from the tip and 20 from the tail, the ski becomes much nicer.

Otherwise, no ones that are not obvious when choosing such a light ski.

Summary:
A terribly stable ski that is still sick easily. I have pressed this ski hard. 12 hour days in the form of eg. Storulvån-> Sylarna-> Syltraversen-> Storulvån in one sweep. Run 55 * gutter in bad before and drove final at NM 2018 on this ski.

In short, this shit has the measure, by the way!

Of course, it will not be as stable at high speed and bad before as an Armada Invictus 108ti, but considering how much terrain is opened thanks to the low weight on the ski, you simply get a little compromise.

Model year: 2018
Riding style: hike, free riding
Length on the ski: 178 cm
Riders weight: 72 kg
Riders length: 180 cm